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sean77
09-26-2009, 01:03 PM
Hello to all my brothers here,

I have a question regarding Subsea Engineer and I hope someone can help me to clear my doubts.

As far as i know, there are two types of Subsea Engineer.

The first type are those who work in design/consultant firm while the second type are those who work for drilling contractors.

An example of the job scope for these two types of Subsea Engineer is as shown below:

Subsea Systems Engineer (Design/Consultant):
Assist with the performance of design / concept & engineering of the project solutions.
Assist with the development of specification and selection of subsea control, umbilical and equipment for subsea production systems. The testing and commissioning requirements of such systems. Directing and assisting in development of testing, installation, operation, and maintenance procedures.
Attend Factory Acceptance Site Integration Tests of new equipment on Contractor's premises; in addition, coordinating the work of contractors employed to design, manufacture, and test subsea control systems, umbilicals and other equipment.
Assisting with the preparation, checking and approving of procedures and working offshore to ensure successful completion of the procedures.
Engage in vendor management.
Ensure that the project conforms to appropriate safety standards and carries all necessary safety assessments.
Carry out tasks within predefined/agreed time scales and budgets, reporting status to the departmental Manager/Project Manager. Interact with department members to ensure that work is produced and issued in a timely manner and project information is distributed amongst them. Complete work within budget and time scales


Subsea Engineer (Drilling Contractor):
Maintain the Blow Out Preventer (BOP), Diverter, and associated subsea equipment in accordance to the Preventive Maintenance System (PMS) guidelines.

Operate and pressure test the BOP on the surface and on the seabed as required.

Supervise the deck and drill crews in the running and recovery of the BOP and Marine Riser equipment.

Assemble, install, and nipple down the BOP and all well control equipment as required.

Operate, and maintain the repair of the subsea BOP control system

Excellent English skills would be an advantage as it will be required for report writing and management. Ideally the Subsea Engineers must have previous experience on Jack Up rigs, Drillships and Semis.
The salary for these positions is highly competitive and it offers an excellent benefits package.


My questions are:

1. Are there any significant difference between the two types of Subsea Engineers?

2. Can a Subsea Systems Engineer from a consultant work as a Subsea Engineer for a drilling contractor?

3. At times, i see position such as Subsea Engineer & Subsea Engineer (II). What is the difference?

Thank you to anyone who can clear my doubts. I hope that this thread can benefit others who are interested as well.

Cheers.

13392017
04-03-2010, 02:58 AM
Sean,
To answer your question, please see a following :
1. Yes, there are a lot of different. The first subsea engineer mainly focus on the design of the facilities to produce/monitor/control the H/C from the wells. Its' related to safety issue, flow assurance etc. The second subsea engineer(drilling contractor) will mainly focus on how to drill subsea well, design a subsea completion to produce H/C safely (it's including subsea wellhead, Subsea X-mas tree, the running tools etc.)
2. It's depend, The first subsea engineer of course will know about the subsea work for second subsea engineer, but not too detail. With training and experience, everything can be achieved.

cheers,
RK

sean77
04-03-2010, 11:19 AM
Greetings RK,

Thanks for the information. Really appreciate it.

Another question i would like to ask is between a subsea engineer and a petroleum engineer, which one has more opportunities to work/live abroad (for example in countries like Australia)? Also, which one earns more money?

THanks

13392017
05-28-2010, 01:35 AM
Both have ability to work abroad. It's depend.

Subsea Engineer have good opportunity in Australia, as this expertise still scarce. For Petroleum Engineer, usually the local people already grab it.
So my suggest is, if you have opportunity go as subsea engineer... high pay but high risk as well.

Cheers,
RK

Azad
05-29-2010, 01:44 PM
I would say that petroleum engineer falls in the subsurafce engineer grouping rather than subsea.

Subsurface - Petroleum, Reservoir, Petrophysicists, Geologists, well completions

Subsea - Controls, Flow Assurance/Process, Structural, Mechanical & Materials, Pipelines, Risers, Trees, Geotechnics, Installation, Pre-commissioning, Commissioning, Inspection and Integrity Management, Intervention

Generally reference to subsea engineer's is normally for Installation, Pre-commissioning, Commissioning, Inspection & Integrity Management and interventions.

Azad

sean77
05-30-2010, 12:46 PM
Both have ability to work abroad. It's depend.

Subsea Engineer have good opportunity in Australia, as this expertise still scarce. For Petroleum Engineer, usually the local people already grab it.
So my suggest is, if you have opportunity go as subsea engineer... high pay but high risk as well.

Cheers,
RK

Hi RK,

Thanks for the reply.

Which type of subsea engineer do you mean here? As far as i'm concern, subsea engineers in design consultants (Controls, Flow Assurance/Process, Structural, Mechanical & Materials, Pipelines, Risers, Trees, Geotechnics, Installation, Pre-commissioning, Commissioning, Inspection and Integrity Management, Intervention) are generally office based and there's no risk at all.


I would say that petroleum engineer falls in the subsurafce engineer grouping rather than subsea.

Subsurface - Petroleum, Reservoir, Petrophysicists, Geologists, well completions

Subsea - Controls, Flow Assurance/Process, Structural, Mechanical & Materials, Pipelines, Risers, Trees, Geotechnics, Installation, Pre-commissioning, Commissioning, Inspection and Integrity Management, Intervention

Generally reference to subsea engineer's is normally for Installation, Pre-commissioning, Commissioning, Inspection & Integrity Management and interventions


Azad


Greetings Azad,

That's a correct categorization. However, there are two types of subsea engineers as i mentioned in my previous post.

The first type of subsea engineers work in design consultants/contractors (Controls, Flow Assurance/Process, Structural, Mechanical & Materials, Pipelines, Risers, Trees etc etc) while the second type work in drilling contractors (BOP, MUX) ...

Azad
05-30-2010, 02:07 PM
Sean,

The original post job spec for subsea engineer (design) is too wide ranging, looks like spec for a controls engineer. We tend to split the job description by disciplines with subsea engineer's job spec for Installation, Pre-commissioning, Commissioning, Inspection & Integrity Management and interventions. Our subsea engineer's tend to go out and manage scope offshore and sub-contractors, liase with operations, vessels etc.

Subsea Engineers (drilling) may have the same qualifications but area of expertise is different. I would suggest that it would be very difficult to move jobs between these two areas. Subsea Engineer term is too widely used for all sorts of different disciplines.

Regards
Azad

sean77
05-30-2010, 03:01 PM
Sean,

The original post job spec for subsea engineer (design) is too wide ranging, looks like spec for a controls engineer. We tend to split the job description by disciplines with subsea engineer's job spec for Installation, Pre-commissioning, Commissioning, Inspection & Integrity Management and interventions. Our subsea engineer's tend to go out and manage scope offshore and sub-contractors, liase with operations, vessels etc.

Subsea Engineers (drilling) may have the same qualifications but area of expertise is different. I would suggest that it would be very difficult to move jobs between these two areas. Subsea Engineer term is too widely used for all sorts of different disciplines.

Regards
Azad

Hi Azad,

I totally agree with your comments. Subsea is indeed a wide field with an array of areas of specialization.

By the way, which sub-discipline of subsea are you under? Where are you currently based? Are you working for a contractor? It's great to hear that subsea engineers in your place get to go offshore.

In addition, which sub-discipline of subsea eng do you think has very good prospect currently and which one would you recommend?

I was told by my superior that currently subsea system engineers (trees) are highly in demand in every region around the world. I was told that all the offices around the world are having difficulty looking for subsea engineers. They are desperately searching for any experienced subsea experts that they can get.


Cheers.

Azad
05-30-2010, 03:09 PM
Hi Sean,

I work in Scotland . I am a Subsea Process / Flow Assurance Engineer. I work on a operations & engineering support contract for two existing subsea fields with FPSO's.

Regards
Azad

sean77
05-30-2010, 03:20 PM
Hi Sean,

I work in Aberdeen, Scotland for Aker Solutions. I am a Subsea Process / Flow Assurance Engineer. I work on a operations & engineering support contract for two existing subsea fields with FPSO's.

Regards
Azad

Hi,

That's a very good sub-discipline because flow assurance is indeed a niche skill pool with very high demand once you have the experience. By the way, i am a Subsea Pipeline Engineer in Malaysia.

Regards,
Sean

cashembassy
06-08-2010, 01:41 PM
hello all,
I intend studying any of the Masters degree courses below this September in the U.K
They are:
1.MSc Mechanical Engineering
2.Msc Subsea Engineering
3.Msc Petroleum Engineering

Which of these courses give more opportunities and pay more since i intend returning to Nigeria to work in a Multinational Oil and Gas firm and in case I change my mind to stay/work abroad too

Azad
06-08-2010, 02:19 PM
1. Msc Petroleum Engineering - at Herriot Watt

2. Subsea Engineering
Cranfield, Newcastle, RGU, Aberdeen

sean77
06-13-2010, 06:47 AM
hello all,
I intend studying any of the Masters degree courses below this September in the U.K
They are:
1.MSc Mechanical Engineering
2.Msc Subsea Engineering
3.Msc Petroleum Engineering

Which of these courses give more opportunities and pay more since i intend returning to Nigeria to work in a Multinational Oil and Gas firm and in case I change my mind to stay/work abroad too

Hello,

To be honest, I'm also relatively new to this field. However, i hope that you can get something out of the following advice.

In my opinion, the main purpose of studying a Masters degree is to get a specific job in the oil industry that you really want, especially when you're currently working in a different industry. Hence, it doesn't make sense if you pursue a very general course such as MSc. in Mechanical Engineering. The rule of thumb is always to study something very specialized, something that will land you the specific job that you have been aiming all these while.

Thus, before you decide which course to take, ask yourself what do you aim to get out of the course? What is the specific position in the industry that you're currently aiming for?

Between subsea and petroleum, the opportunities depends.

If you're planning to go back to your home country and you're confident that you can get into an exploration & production company, then i would advice you to go for petroleum engineering.

But, if you prefer an internationally mobile type of occupation, i think it's better if you go for subsea engineering. The reason is because petroleum engineering jobs are slightly limited to E&P and service companies which normally prioritize the local workforce while subsea engineers can work in E&P, consultant, service companies, EPC contractors, inspection companies, drilling contractor, manufacturer and even certification body (DNV, Lloyd etc etc).

Please read the previous post to find out the different types of subsea engineer though.

Regarding the pay, I myself have no idea which one pays more.

If there's anything not right with my advice, i hope others (maybe Azad) can correct me.

Azad
06-13-2010, 01:42 PM
Sean,

I agree with your advice, I have said the same in response to PM.

I would only add that to getting a job in places like Nigeria as a Petroleum Engineer is probaly more difficult, even though it pays better. The reason for this is that quite a few colleges/ Universities in Nigeria run this course and it has a quite a high prestige / status symbol in the country. Low Demand with High supply - need connections not just ability, to get a good job as Petroleum Engineer.

On the other hand Subsea Engineering courses are new or non existant in Nigeria with expanding scope, it would be easier to get a job with number of different companies in the chain as you have descibed above.

Regards
Azad

sean77
06-18-2010, 05:17 PM
Sean,

I agree with your advice, I have said the same in response to PM.

I would only add that to getting a job in places like Nigeria as a Petroleum Engineer is probaly more difficult, even though it pays better. The reason for this is that quite a few colleges/ Universities in Nigeria run this course and it has a quite a high prestige / status symbol in the country. Low Demand with High supply - need connections not just ability, to get a good job as Petroleum Engineer.

On the other hand Subsea Engineering courses are new or non existant in Nigeria with expanding scope, it would be easier to get a job with number of different companies in the chain as you have descibed above.

Regards
Azad

Azad,

Is it true that subsurface jobs (petroleum engineers, well engineer, reservoir, petrophysicists, geophysicists etc) generally pay higher than other discipline (subsea, flow assurance, structural etc etc)....for example, in Aberdeen? In south east asia, that's a reality. Experienced drilling engineers & even drilling fluid consultants get paid a fortune here.

Also, what do you think about subsea inspection, repair & maintenance (IRM)? Well, I'm quite interested in this field especially subsea pipeline IRM. The recent Macondo blowout set an alarm in the industry and I believe subsea IRM will have a highly significant role from this point forward (anything to do with inspection i supposed).

Azad
06-21-2010, 03:02 PM
Sean,

Yes It true that Subsurface related disciplines are better paid then the subsea disciplines.

Subsea Integrity Management Systems (SIMs) include IRM activities, are not generally as well paid as Subsea controls, process/flow assurance, structural etc

Regards
Azad

sean77
06-21-2010, 03:56 PM
Sean,

Yes It true that Subsurface related disciplines are better paid then the subsea disciplines.

Subsea Integrity Management Systems (SIMs) include IRM activities, are not generally as well paid as Subsea controls, process/flow assurance, structural etc

Regards
Azad

Azad,

Thanks for the information. All these while, I have this perception that subsea integrity guys get paid really well as compared to other disciplines. What about Subsea Pipeline Engineer in Aberdeen? What is is the average annual salary like?

Since you're an experienced engineer, would really appreciate if you can give me some advice on whether I should continue with subsea pipeline design (rigid) or are there any areas where I should specialized? subsea hardware (xmas tree etc), flow assurance, flexibles engineer, riser engineer, mooring analysis engineer or anything else in your mind??

Thank you very much and I appreciate every single advice from you.

Cheers,
Sean

Azad
06-21-2010, 04:19 PM
Subsea Hardware (xmas tree etc) - Mechanical
Flow Assurance - Process

I would suggest you get a good level of experience in pipeline design from concept to feed, detail design and installation. It is advantageous to gain some experience in flexibles & riser engineering, as well as mooring analysis and soil mechanics.

Specialisation can provide greater rewards while there is demand but can also limit chances of getting a job when demand is low in specialised area. My advice would be to gain as varied experience as possible without limiting your opportunities around the globe.

Salary Estimates
Graduate Engineer : 25-35 K [0-2 years Experience]
Engineer : 30-45 K [2-5 Years]
Senior Engineer : 40 - 50 K [5 - 7 Years]

Taxes in UK are quite high!

Regards
Azad

sean77
06-22-2010, 04:13 PM
Subsea Hardware (xmas tree etc) - Mechanical
Flow Assurance - Process

I would suggest you get a good level of experience in pipeline design from concept to feed, detail design and installation. It is advantageous to gain some experience in flexibles & riser engineering, as well as mooring analysis and soil mechanics.

Specialisation can provide greater rewards while there is demand but can also limit chances of getting a job when demand is low in specialised area. My advice would be to gain as varied experience as possible without limiting your opportunities around the globe.

Salary Estimates
Graduate Engineer : 25-35 K [0-2 years Experience]
Engineer : 30-45 K [2-5 Years]
Senior Engineer : 40 - 50 K [5 - 7 Years]

Taxes in UK are quite high!

Regards
Azad

Greetings,

Thanks for the advice. I really appreciate it.

Are those post-tax salary? 40 - 50 K per annum for a senior pipeline engineer is quite low i think. Well, maybe that's the rate in the UK.

Moving from subsea pipeline to subsea hardware would be a real challenge as both are totally different things. The best place to start as a subsea hardware engineer is definitely the manufacturers (aker, fmc, vetco etc etc) in my opinion.

I guess I'll take your advice and focus on subsea pipeline design at the moment.

Thanks.

Cheers,
Sean

sameerc12
04-16-2011, 12:21 PM
Azad, Sean,

Hi! I am a Mechanical Engineer, with 3 years' experience in Offshore Oil & Gas EPC Platform Projects.
I have an offer to study at the University of aberdeen - MSc Subsea Engineering.

Please give your thoughts on this course.
Also, as subsea is a new area of study "for me", please guide how i can make the transition as smooth as possible ...

I would highly appreciate your every advice...

Thanks Mentors ...


Sameer

aki2cunihin
04-18-2011, 10:52 AM
Azad, Sean,

Hi! I am a Mechanical Engineer, with 3 years' experience in Offshore Oil & Gas EPC Platform Projects.
I have an offer to study at the University of aberdeen - MSc Subsea Engineering.

Please give your thoughts on this course.
Also, as subsea is a new area of study "for me", please guide how i can make the transition as smooth as possible ...

I would highly appreciate your every advice...

Thanks Mentors ...


Sameer


Sameer,
it's a great opportunity I think..
I am also interested in subsea engineering MSc program taught in University of Aberdeen, and planning to submit the student application next year.
Would you mind sharing about your admission to the University?
I am a Pipeline Engineer with 2 yrs working experience in EPC..how bout my chance?
Is there any scholarship opportunity for the 3rd country citizen?

thanks in advance..
fawzee

Azad
04-18-2011, 02:33 PM
Sameer,

It may be a good opporunity to become a subsea mechanical engineer by studying subsea engineering. Subsea engineering is a broad subject with limited specialisation. It may be better to join a subsea company with your current qualifications and get on the job training experience. I would suggest doing Pipeline Engineering course at Newcastle or Cranfield for better job opportunities & financial rewards.


Fawzee,
I think it is probably not a great option to study subsea engineering, you should stick to pipeline engineering. I would suggest you get a good level of experience in pipeline design from concept to feed, detail design and installation. It is advantageous to gain some experience in flexibles & riser engineering, as well as mooring analysis and soil mechanics. Pipeline engineers are better paid then subsea engineers, at least in the UK.

Regards
Azad

sameerc12
04-19-2011, 07:11 AM
Thanks Azad,

Well, how is University of Aberdeen rated for the subsea engg. course ?
Also, from where have you completed your specialisation ? and in which discipline ?

How is Uni of Aberdeen rated for subsea engg. (Especially from the employers' point of view) ?

Thanks again for your guidance..!!


Fawzee,
I am from India, and unfortunately Uni of Aberdeen doesn't offer much by way of India specific scholarships...
However, they do have some very interesting "Company Sponsorships" from tech giants such as technip, Opto, chevron, (specifically targeted for british and american nationals)....

You can check it out at the unis course webpage...

Sameer

sean77
08-27-2011, 01:28 PM
Sameer,

It may be a good opporunity to become a subsea mechanical engineer by studying subsea engineering. Subsea engineering is a broad subject with limited specialisation. It may be better to join a subsea company with your current qualifications and get on the job training experience. I would suggest doing Pipeline Engineering course at Newcastle or Cranfield for better job opportunities & financial rewards.


Fawzee,
I think it is probably not a great option to study subsea engineering, you should stick to pipeline engineering. I would suggest you get a good level of experience in pipeline design from concept to feed, detail design and installation. It is advantageous to gain some experience in flexibles & riser engineering, as well as mooring analysis and soil mechanics. Pipeline engineers are better paid then subsea engineers, at least in the UK.

Regards
Azad
re


Azad, Sameer, Fawzee:

I agree with your opinion to a certain extent. Subsea engineering is a really broad area and can be generally categorized into 3 main disciplines namely Pipelines, Subsea Systems/Hardware and Flow Assurance. However, I think in the next few years, subsea hardware engineers will be more in demand compared to rigid pipeline engineers as at the moment the numbers are increasing and it is anticipated that there could be a glut of pipeline engineers in the future just like conventional disciplines ie mechanical piping, static, rotating, structural etc. Regarding the course at aberdeen, i can't say much about it and I think we should go with Azad's advice.

I think the question about which is better between subsea hardware vs subsea pipeline depends on the region where you are working. If you look at the prospect 'down under' now, companies are offering experienced subsea hardware engineers out-of-the-world hourly rates for contract positions. The reason being subsea engineers are rare and harder to find compared to pipeline engineers nowadays.

These are just my humble opinion and not necessarily true. I am asking the same question as well whether i should move to subsea hardware engineering.

So Azad, which do you think is better in the next few years? Subsea hardware or subsea pipeline

Cheers

Azad
08-27-2011, 02:21 PM
Sean,

Your Question - Subsea hardware or subsea pipeline over the next few years ?

To me these are inter-changeable. Most of the pipeline engineers I have worked with have a Mechanical Engineering degree with very few with additional pipeline engineering Masters. What they have is on the job traing and experience either in Pipeline design or hardware [valves, piping etc].

Hardware engineering is also a quite broad field includes trees, completions, control systems, structures etc, so it is difficult to say which of these will be in more demand. What I can say is that all subsea field development disciplines will be in high demand for the foreseable future.

My background is Subsea Process / Flow Assurance all based in the UK. Other parts of the world may have differing requirements & shortages. Rates in the UK have gone up 20% over the last year.

At end of the day "It is supply & demand" - If demand exceeds supply in your area of expertise then your financial rewards will continue to be greater then other areas where supply exceeds demand.

Regards
Azad

sean77
08-27-2011, 03:49 PM
Greetings Azad,

Totally agree with you. At the end of the day, it goes back to the "supply & demand" principle. Good to hear that the rates for subsea as a whole are going up everywhere and I hope the trend continues. :joyous:


Cheers,
Sean

jarod chai
09-28-2011, 11:17 AM
hi,

I am from malaysia, but not in Oil & Gas industry. I am chamical engineering background. I am deeply interested in flow assurance cos i lovw fluid mechanics and i have learnt some pipesim (begineer) downloaded from this forum. I have several question would like to ask all the guru here.

1. Is there any master in multiphase flow in any of the universiti in malaysia or perhaps other uni in UK?
2. I ;ve been searching for graduate flow assurance eng position in the job advert for several months already but hardly found one. In order to become a flow assurance engineer, what kind of position should i started as? Process engineer? or can gurus recommend any company dealing with flow assurance stuff / multiphase flow equipments or design? I wont mind started from low, as long as i can learn flow assurance knowledge with the Experts , i;m satisfied,

prathap singh
10-03-2011, 10:14 AM
how much does a entry level and experienced subsea engineer make annually and explain about there on and off days

prathap singh
10-03-2011, 10:15 AM
how much does a entry level and experienced subsea engineer make annually and explain about thier on and off day..

shoppingbag917
01-30-2012, 03:47 PM
Azad : Cranfield University and University of Strathclyde...which is the best as regards Subsea Engineering??

shoppingbag917
01-30-2012, 04:11 PM
Azad
Kindly enlighten me on the employability of University of Strathclyde Subsea engineering graduates and that of Cranfield University...Thanks

Azad
01-30-2012, 04:17 PM
I would suggest for Masters Degree:

1. Cranfield
2. Newcastle
3. Strathclyde

But if you are scottish, I would go to Strathclyde [no Tuition fees]. In terms of employability, the difference is not that great, but Cranfield would be better.

Regards
Azad

shoppingbag917
01-30-2012, 11:13 PM
Thank you Azad...I appreciate...am an international student just got offer from the two schools...trying to figure out the best...as per tuiton d difference is 1200, strathclyde is 14800, cranfield is 16000...
However, I don't mind tuition as long as the quality is great and recognised by employers...
Another question is can a subsea engineer get a permanent appointment on an offshore platform, if not what course do u suggest to secure a place on the platform...I am in love with offshore oil platforms, wanna work on one someday...

Azad
01-31-2012, 12:55 PM
Shoppingbag,

If money is an issue, I would go to Strathclyde. Cranfield is based in a small town/village, while Strathclyde & Newcastle are based in major cities which would allow you to work part time to ease the financial burden somewhat.

Working offshore - There are opportunities for working offshore on installation vessels, drilling rigs as well as on production facilities for tie-in and commissioning operations. A subsea engineering may not lead to working on a production facilities / platform on a continuous basis but on project by project basis.

Regards
Azad

shoppingbag917
02-01-2012, 11:49 AM
Azad,
Thank you!!!, Don't know if you have heard of the oil & gas engineering programme at memorial university in canada...if you have; what do you think of the program & what kinda jobs can one secure with such a MSc...
Also, for petroleum related courses, would u prefer the UK or Canada, with regards to employability and quality of taught courses.
Thanks once again

Azad
02-01-2012, 01:49 PM
I am sorry to say I do not knwledge to comment on situtaion in Canada. I am UK based and have only worked in the UK.

sean77
03-31-2012, 07:53 PM
Hi Azad,

Greetings, it's been a long time since i posted here. How's everything in the UK?

equate123
04-01-2012, 06:01 AM
Dear All,
Can any body clarify what is the role of an Electronics & Communication Engineer or Electrical & Electronics Engineer in SUB SEA related jobs or does job opportunity exists for the above said engineer..
Thanks in advance

Azad
04-01-2012, 04:24 PM
Hi Sean,

UK is busy, there is lot of work around and it looks like 2012 is going to be a very busy year. O&G sector has been immune to the credit crunch affecting the world.

Equate123 - I would categorise what you describe in the "Controls Engineer" grouping.

Regards
Azad

equate123
04-01-2012, 09:09 PM
Thanks for your comment... but I couldn't get you... Please give a straight forward answer

equate123
04-02-2012, 03:52 PM
Mr Azad,
I couldn't find details in the "control Engineer" grouping.. It is up to you to respond..

Pecot3453
07-15-2012, 08:49 AM
Hi azad,

I am ICSS engineer with experience in instrument and control. Currently i am expanding my experience in FPSO. but how do can i get subsea field of experience? How to start? I notice that subsea are really different field of area, with different type of protection and environment. Its really help if sumone that from experience of instrument and control, and became subsea control engineer. Sharing is caring...

Azad
07-15-2012, 02:04 PM
Dear Pecot,

All you need to get is the experience. If you are working on the FPSO topsides, then you will also need to interface the subsea control system [e.g. ICSS interfaces with MCS - Master Control Station]. MCS controls the subsea functionality [monitoring, comms, PSD, ESD, well control etc].

Regards
Azad

civilengineer
09-18-2012, 02:10 AM
Hello guys

I hope any of you can help me to take the right decision...
I'm civil engineer specialized in highways and infrastructure, I have 10 years experience in my field.
I'm offered to change my career into oil and gas industry (subsea engineering) in project management company in Aberdeen

Now I don't know .. I thought a lot about it ... it is good to have another specialization (double careers) but also I want to make sure is the subsea engineering has a good future ?

Can anyone help me with this decision please

Azad
09-18-2012, 10:36 AM
If you are in the UK, I would advise you to go for it. Subsea has a bright future and there are skill shortages at the moment. It is financially more rewarding then civil / road building sector.

Regards
Azad

mjk
09-21-2012, 02:05 AM
Hi,

I'm a fresh petroleum engineer. I'm interested in Subsea engineering, and it's been offered for the first time in America. University of Houston is starting this certified course.

Can any tell me will it be difficult for a petroleum engineering to go into subsea field ? my impression is Subsea engineering is basically for mechanical engineers..

Thanks in advance.

Muhammad

sean77
09-30-2012, 12:37 PM
Hi,

I'm a fresh petroleum engineer. I'm interested in Subsea engineering, and it's been offered for the first time in America. University of Houston is starting this certified course.

Can any tell me will it be difficult for a petroleum engineering to go into subsea field ? my impression is Subsea engineering is basically for mechanical engineers..

Thanks in advance.

Muhammad

Muhammad,

Subsea engineering is a very wide field consisting of engineers from all disciplines e.g mechanical, structural, chemical, electrical etc. Depending which type of subsea engineer you meant, the background varies. Most subsea pipeline and subsea system engineers are from mechanical/structural/electrical background while flow assurance engineers are from chemical eng background.

If you have petroleum engineering background, I think you should focus on flow assurance. Nevertheless, you can still choose subsea pipeline or subsea system if you have the interest. At the moment, just take the course first and be the pioneer batch in Uni. of Houston..later you'll know which path to take.

sean77
09-30-2012, 12:42 PM
Hi Sean,

UK is busy, there is lot of work around and it looks like 2012 is going to be a very busy year. O&G sector has been immune to the credit crunch affecting the world.

Equate123 - I would categorise what you describe in the "Controls Engineer" grouping.

Regards
Azad

Greetings Azad,

Good to hear from you. We have been quite busy in this region as well. Well, time really flies...it has been 3 years already since I first posted in this forum and you replied to my message (back in 2009).

After 3 solid years, I think I'm ready for a new challenge currently "actively seeking" :) Any opportunity at your place for a pipeliner?

Regards,
Sean

mjk
09-30-2012, 08:34 PM
Muhammad,

Subsea engineering is a very wide field consisting of engineers from all disciplines e.g mechanical, structural, chemical, electrical etc. Depending which type of subsea engineer you meant, the background varies. Most subsea pipeline and subsea system engineers are from mechanical/structural/electrical background while flow assurance engineers are from chemical eng background.

If you have petroleum engineering background, I think you should focus on flow assurance. Nevertheless, you can still choose subsea pipeline or subsea system if you have the interest. At the moment, just take the course first and be the pioneer batch in Uni. of Houston..later you'll know which path to take.

Thanks Sean, I'm just worried about UOH Job placement.

solution
03-07-2013, 08:37 PM
hi
if you need any engineering software
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thanks

jsanders
05-03-2013, 10:37 PM
I work for a Subsea Design Consultancy and I can help answer this question:

1. Product Design / Development companies like Cameron or GE Oil & Gas design & manufacture the actual equipment. (i.e. valve, connector, tree... etc...)
2. Engineering Design / Consultancies design the systems based on client requirements. So consultancies will put all the pieces together to make a system that can produce a well.
3. Drilling contractors actually use the system that was designed by the consultancy.
4. Operators create all of the projects and turn oil into a usable product.

My name is John Sanders and I work for a major engineering design firm based in the United States. We have an office in Angola with a position open for a Subsea Project Manager. If you know anyone with this sort of background, please have them contact me at john.sanders@intecsea.com

The project manager role will be supporting major projects with one of the largest multinational oil producers. It is a very high profile role with excellent benefits and compensation.

We are accepting applications today.

etexaco
05-07-2013, 12:21 AM
hi,
Pls can any body advice me, i am a graduate in electrical electronics engineering, i want a career in subsea engineering, how do i start?

I am just about to enroll for a city and guilds level 3 certificate in subsea technology.
what can i do to enter the subsea sector since i heard it is for only mechcanical, civil, petroleum.

which sectors in subsea can i develop myself or do i go for masters in subsea eng? but i dont't have d finance

Azad
05-07-2013, 10:21 AM
Subsea Controls would be a good fit with your qualifications.

George07
07-07-2013, 08:39 AM
Dear All,

This forum has been very helpful to me but i can not say i have gotten a total satisfaction for my queries. I have an postgraduate degree in Engineering Design from the UK and have been worked as a product design engineer and moved to a Project Engineer. With no job satisfaction, i have decided to move into the Oil and Gas industry and Subsea Engineering in particular.

I opted for the University of Houston who will be pioneering their first set of Masters students this fall. I have read comments on 'demand and supply' within the industry and this was influential to my decision as my graduate experience in the UK was nothing good to write home about.

My big question is however, will it be worthwhile doing this specialised course without prior experience even though you know skills can be transferable (i.e. Project engineering skills)

ankitmago
07-07-2013, 09:37 AM
Dear All,

This forum has been very helpful to me but i can not say i have gotten a total satisfaction for my queries. I have an postgraduate degree in Engineering Design from the UK and have been worked as a product design engineer and moved to a Project Engineer. With no job satisfaction, i have decided to move into the Oil and Gas industry and Subsea Engineering in particular.

I opted for the University of Houston who will be pioneering their first set of Masters students this fall. I have read comments on 'demand and supply' within the industry and this was influential to my decision as my graduate experience in the UK was nothing good to write home about.

My big question is however, will it be worthwhile doing this specialised course without prior experience even though you know skills can be transferable (i.e. Project engineering skills)


Hello George,

I am not in a position to answer your query but would appreciate if you could help me with this.

I am a petroleum engg and working with Halliburton, I wish to pursue MS (Subsea Engg) through distance learning program could you please help me out with best of the universities across the globe offering the course as you must have researched befor opting for U of H.

Regards,
Ankit

George07
10-18-2013, 10:30 PM
Hello George,

I am not in a position to answer your query but would appreciate if you could help me with this.

I am a petroleum engg and working with Halliburton, I wish to pursue MS (Subsea Engg) through distance learning program could you please help me out with best of the universities across the globe offering the course as you must have researched befor opting for U of H.

Regards,
Ankit

Hi Ankit,

I can not really give you an answer to your question. It basically depends on what the ultimate goal is. My choice of UH was because of career opportunity. Being the first in the US, i reckoned there will be more opportunities. The University of Aberdeen has been offering the program for a while now. I have a friend who has been seeking employment since graduation. It is never automatic, but i believe in Houston with more companies, there will be greater opportunities.

SLB
12-05-2013, 09:47 AM
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tanweerkhan
02-18-2014, 09:50 AM
Subsea Controls would be a good fit with your qualifications.

Hi all,

I completed my mechanical engineering in 2000 and have around 13 years of exp with last 6 years in onshore pipeline designing. I want to prusue M Sc in subsea engineering. please guide me about the universities and fees along with job prospects. I am from India and as you all are aware that UK rules are very strict now a days and its very tough to get jobs in UK for non EU candidates.

Thanks in advance

tanweerkhan
02-18-2014, 10:44 AM
Subsea Controls would be a good fit with your qualifications.

Hi all,

I completed my mechanical engineering in 2000 and have around 13 years of exp with last 6 years in onshore pipeline designing. I want to prusue M Sc in subsea engineering. please guide me about the universities and fees along with job prospects. I am from India and as you all are aware that UK rules are very strict now a days and its very tough to get jobs in UK for non EU candidates.

Thanks in advance

seel_20
02-18-2014, 04:24 PM
The University of Houston in the USA started offering the program few years ago, and the fees are $3000 us per subsea class.

I have no idea about the jobs opportunities.

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