PDA

View Full Version : Performance Drilling



aga003
12-18-2009, 08:09 PM
hi every buddy

dose any one have any data about the different between conventional drilling and performance drilling comparisons ,chart ,guidelines,....etc

reservoirengineer
12-21-2009, 11:12 AM
Beaware of spammers!

Here is the link too. It might be identity fraud.



Common Fraud Schemes
Extra
The FBI is warning the public about an ongoing scheme involving jury service. Please be aware that individuals identifying themselves as U.S. court employees have been contacting citizens by phone and advising them that they have been selected for jury duty. These individuals ask citizens to verify names and social security numbers and then ask for their credit card numbers. If the request is refused, citizens are then threatened with fines. Details
Common Fraud Scams
- Telemarketing Fraud
- Fraud Alert
- Nigerian Letter or 419 Fraud
- Impersonation/Identity Fraud
- Advance Fee Scheme
- Health Insurance
- Redemption/Strawman/Bond Fraud
Investment Related Scams
- Letter of Credit Fraud
- Prime Bank Note
- Ponzi Scheme
- Pyramid Scheme
Internet Scams
- Internet Auction Fraud
- Non-Delivery of Merchandise
- Credit Card Fraud
- Investment Fraud
- Business Fraud
- Nigerian Letter Scam
Fraud Target: Senior Citizens
- Health Insurance Fraud
- Counterfeit Prescription Drugs
- Funeral and Cemetery Fraud
- Fraudulent "Anti-Aging" Products
- Telemarketing Fraud
- Internet Fraud
- Investment Schemes
- Reverse Mortgage Scams



red envelope Get e-mail updates when new fraud schemes are posted here

Telemarketing Fraud

When you send money to people you do not know personally or give personal or financial information to unknown callers, you increase your chances of becoming a victim of telemarketing fraud.

Warning signs -- what a caller may tell you:
- "You must act 'now' or the offer won't be good."
- "You've won a 'free' gift, vacation, or prize." But you have to pay for "postage and handling" or other charges.
- "You must send money, give a credit card or bank account number, or have a check picked up by courier." You may hear this before you have had a chance to consider the offer carefully.
- "You don't need to check out the company with anyone." The callers say you do not need to speak to anyone including your family, lawyer, accountant, local Better Business Bureau, or consumer protection agency.
- "You don't need any written information about their company or their references."
- "You can't afford to miss this 'high-profit, no-risk' offer."

If you hear these--or similar--"lines" from a telephone salesperson, just say "no thank you," and hang up the phone.
Some Tips to Avoid Telemarketing Fraud:
It's very difficult to get your money back if you've been cheated over the phone. Before you buy anything by telephone, remember:

*
Don't buy from an unfamiliar company. Legitimate businesses understand that you want more information about their company and are happy to comply.
*
Always ask for and wait until you receive written material about any offer or charity. If you get brochures about costly investments, ask someone whose financial advice you trust to review them. But, unfortunately, beware -- not everything written down is true.
*
Always check out unfamiliar companies with your local consumer protection agency, Better Business Bureau, state Attorney General, the National Fraud Information Center, or other watchdog groups. Unfortunately, not all bad businesses can be identified through these organizations.
*
Obtain a salesperson's name, business identity, telephone number, street address, mailing address, and business license number before you transact business. Some con artists give out false names, telephone numbers, addresses, and business license numbers. Verify the accuracy of these items.
*
Before you give money to a charity or make an investment, find out what percentage of the money is paid in commissions and what percentage actually goes to the charity or investment.
*
Before you send money, ask yourself a simple question. "What guarantee do I really have that this solicitor will use my money in the manner we agreed upon?"
*
You must not be asked to pay in advance for services. Pay services only after they are delivered.
*
Some con artists will send a messenger to your home to pick up money, claiming it is part of their service to you. In reality, they are taking your money without leaving any trace of who they are or where they can be reached.
*
Always take your time making a decision. Legitimate companies won't pressure you to make a snap decision.
*
Don't pay for a "free prize." If a caller tells you the payment is for taxes, he or she is violating federal law.
*
Before you receive your next sales pitch, decide what your limits are -- the kinds of financial information you will and won't give out on the telephone.
*
It's never rude to wait and think about an offer. Be sure to talk over big investments offered by telephone salespeople with a trusted friend, family member, or financial advisor.
*
Never respond to an offer you don't understand thoroughly.
*
Never send money or give out personal information such as credit card numbers and expiration dates, bank account numbers, dates of birth, or social security numbers to unfamiliar companies or unknown persons.
*
Your personal information is often brokered to telemarketers through third parties.
*
If you have information about a fraud report it to state, local, or federal law enforcement agencies.

Top of Page



Nigerian Letter or "419" Fraud

Nigerian letter frauds combine the threat of impersonation fraud with a variation of an advance fee scheme in which a letter, mailed from Nigeria, offers the recipient the "opportunity" to share in a percentage of millions of dollars that the author, a self-proclaimed government official, is trying to transfer illegally out of Nigeria. The recipient is encouraged to send information to the author, such as blank letterhead stationery, bank name and account numbers and other identifying information using a facsimile number provided in the letter. Some of these letters have also been received via E-mail through the Internet. The scheme relies on convincing a willing victim, who has demonstrated a "propensity for larceny" by responding to the invitation, to send money to the author of the letter in Nigeria in several installments of increasing amounts for a variety of reasons.

Payment of taxes, bribes to government officials, and legal fees are often described in great detail with the promise that all expenses will be reimbursed as soon as the funds are spirited out of Nigeria. In actuality, the millions of dollars do not exist and the victim eventually ends up with nothing but loss. Once the victim stops sending money, the perpetrators have been known to use the personal information and checks that they received to impersonate the victim, draining bank accounts and credit card balances until the victim's assets are taken in their entirety. While such an invitation impresses most law-abiding citizens as a laughable hoax, millions of dollars in losses are caused by these schemes annually. Some victims have been lured to Nigeria, where they have been imprisoned against their will, in addition to losing large sums of money. The Nigerian government is not sympathetic to victims of these schemes, since the victim actually conspires to remove funds from Nigeria in a manner that is contrary to Nigerian law. The schemes themselves violate section 419 of the Nigerian criminal code, hence the label "419 fraud."

Some Tips to Avoid Nigerian Letter or "419" Fraud:

*
If you receive a letter from Nigeria asking you to send personal or banking information, do not reply in any manner. Send the letter to the U.S. Secret Service, your local FBI office, or the U.S. Postal Inspection Service. You can also register a complaint with the Federal Trade Commissionís Consumer Sentinel.
*
If you know someone who is corresponding in one of these schemes, encourage that person to contact the FBI or the U.S. Secret Service as soon as possible.
*
Be skeptical of individuals representing themselves as Nigerian or foreign government officials asking for your help in placing large sums of money in overseas bank accounts.
*
Do not believe the promise of large sums of money for your cooperation.
*
Guard your account information carefully.

Top of Page



Impersonation/Identity Fraud

Impersonation fraud occurs when someone assumes your identity to perform a fraud or other criminal act. Criminals can get the information they need to assume your identity from a variety of sources, such as the theft of your wallet, your trash, or from credit or bank information. They may approach you in person, by telephone, or on the Internet and ask you for the information.

The sources of information about you are so numerous that you cannot prevent the theft of your identity. But you can minimize your risk of loss by following a few simple hints.

Some Tips to Avoid Impersonation/Identity Fraud:

*
Never throw away ATM receipts, credit statements, credit cards, or bank statements in a usable form.
*
Never give your credit card number over the telephone unless you make the call.
*
Reconcile your bank account monthly and notify your bank of discrepancies immediately.
*
Keep a list of telephone numbers to call to report the loss or theft of your wallet, credit cards, etc.
*
Report unauthorized financial transactions to your bank, credit card company, and the police as soon as you detect them.
*
Review a copy of your credit report at least once each year. Notify the credit bureau in writing of any questionable entries and follow through until they are explained or removed.
*
If your identity has been assumed, ask the credit bureau to print a statement to that effect in your credit report.
*
If you know of anyone who receives mail from credit card companies or banks in the names of others, report it to local or federal law enforcement authorities.




FROM THE DESK OF MR MUSA USMAN,
AUDITING AND ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT.
BANK OF AFRICA (BOA) email usmanmusa018@yahoo.co.jp

ABIDJAN COTE 'IVOIRE.

DEAR FRIEND,

I HOPED THAT YOU WILL NOT BETRAY THIS TRUST AND CONFIDENT THAT I AM ABOUT TO IMPOSE ON YOU FOR THE MUTUAL BENEFIT OF OUR FAMILIES.

I NEED YOUR URGENT ASSISTANCE IN TRANSFERRING THE SUM OF (USD29.5 M) MILLION TO YOUR ACCOUNT WITHIN 10 TO 17 BANK WORKING DAYS.

THIS MONEY HAS BEEN DORMANT FOR YEARS IN OUR BANK WITHOUT ANY BODY CLAIMING THE FUND.

I WANT THE BANK TO RELEASE THE MONEY TO YOU AS THE NEXT OF KIN TO OUR DECEASED CUSTOMER.

THE OWNER OF THE ACCOUNT WAS ONE OF OUR FOREIGN CUSTOMERS, MR. ANDREAS SCHRANNER WHO DIED ALONG WITH HIS ENTIRE FAMILY ON MONDAY 31th JULY 2000 PLANE CRASH.


AFTER TRANSFER OF THE MONEY, 45% OF THIS MONEY WILL BE FOR YOU IN RESPECT OF THE PROVISION YOU MADE BY STANDING AS THE NEXT OF KIN TO CLAIM THIS FUND WHY 55% WILL BE FOR ME. YOU AND I WILL TAKE CARE OF THE EXPENSES THAT WILL COME UP DURRING THE TIME OF TRANSFER.

OUR BANK OFFICIALS ARE PLANING TO DIVERT THE FUND INTO BANK TREASSURY AS UNCLAIMED FUND BY THE END OF THIS FISCAL YEAR. I DON'T WANT THE MONEY TO GO INTO OUR BANK ACCOUNT AS AN ABANDONED FUND. SO THIS IS THE REASON WHY I CONTACTED YOU SO THAT THE BANK CAN RELEASE THE MONEY TO YOU AS THE NEXT OF KIN TO OUR THE DECEASED CUSTOMER.

I WILL GIVE YOU MORE DETAILS ABOUT THIS PROJECT WHEN I HEAR FROM YOU.

I NEED THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION:


1. NAME IN FULL:.......................

2. ADDRESS:..............................

3. NATIONALITY:......................

4. AGE:.....................................

5. ---........................................

6. OCCUPATION:......................

7. MARITAL STATUS:............

8. PHONE..................................

9. FAX:........................................

10. SCAN AND SEND A COPY OF YOUR IDENTITY CARD TO ME.


BEST REGARDS,
MUSA USMAN


You can view this site to know more.